This general cemetery was opened in 1869.

The cemetery is divided into eight sections:

  • A large general lawn area
  • A Jewish section, which is also lawn with two concrete beams    
  • Roman Catholic, Methodist, Church of England and Presbyterian sections, which contain old-style grave sites    
  • A small General area and a Salvation Army section.  

Headstones and tributes

A concrete beam has been constructed to hold approved headstones in the lawn cemetery. Council is not responsible for maintaining headstones or memorials.

Floral tributes are restricted to the concrete beam next to each headstone. Ornaments, crosses, statues, icons, vases or other items are not allowed on the lawn and flowers, shrubs grass or trees cannot be planted at a gravesite or elsewhere in the lawn cemetery.

Memorial Garden

The memorial Gardens have been designed to blend into the natural surroundings and have 343 granite marker and bases. The marker and base is secured to a concrete foundation and a bronze plaque is placed on the face of the marker. The ash container is buried in the garden behind the granite pillar.

Landscaping and trees surround the memorial gardens which are located around the pergola, where cemetery visitors can sit and remember.

Council’s Bereavement Officers are available to facilitate ash and plaque placement at an arranged time Monday to Friday. Family and friends are welcome to be present and may choose to hold a memorial service at this time.”

Memorial Niche Wall

Noraville cemetery also features a niche wall with 100 receptacles for receiving cremated remains. Each receptacle holds approximately half the ashes. A Niche can be purchased in advance and reserved. Each niche in the Memorial Wall has a bud holder for flowers.

Reverence Niche Wall

The newly installed “Reverence” Niche Wall is able to hold all of the ashes.

A niche can be purchased in advance and reserved. When ashes are placed a memorial inscription on the granite panel is supplied.
 
Council’s Bereavement Officers are available to facilitate ash and plaque placement at an arranged time Monday to Friday. Family and friends are welcome to be present and may choose to hold a memorial service at this time.”

Organising a Plaque

Council orders all plaques. They can take up to six weeks to be made. 

It is the families’ choice for the details included on the inscription. A maximum of ten lines and 30 characters including spaces per line is recommended. Examples of what to choose for the inscription include; full name or nickname of the deceased; date of birth and date of death; relationship of deceased; and phrase of remembrance. 

If ashes aren’t going to be placed in the niche in the near future, a ‘Reserved’ plaque can be affixed by Council, at the request of the Grantee. 


Return to the Cemeteries and Memorial Gardens page to download required application forms.